Postcards from Devon

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Queen Street, Exeter 1905

Queen Street, Exeter 1905

George Hiscock Stentiford (see Issue 7) would have walked down this street many times as he returned to his job and his home in Exeter's Liberal Club in Bradninch Place, turning left a few yards beyond the horse and cart in the centre of the picture.

The tram going down to the Great Western Railway Station at St. David's would also have passed the Southern Railway Station further on in Queen Street. The building on the right, which has the words "Supported by Voluntary Contributions" on its walls, was the Exeter Infirmary..

 

The pulpit of the parish church of St. Peter and St. Paul in Ermington

The pulpit of the parish church of St. Peter and St. Paul in Ermington.

This is the church in which Edmund Stentiford married Elizabeth Coleman in September 1786 (see Issue 5). Ermington was surrounded by small quarries supplying stone for the Admiralty in Plymouth. You can find information about some of the Stentifords who worked in these quarries at

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~stonemen

The church is full of beautiful woodcarvings all  done in the 1880s and 1890s by the daughters of the Rector at that time - Mary, Esther and Violet Pinwill,  Later they  moved into Plymouth and together set up a successful woodcarving business. There are carvings by these three women to be found in over 100 Devon churches. Violet supervised all the work and the many men they employed, retiring in 1954 when she was 80.

 

Ponies on the common above Stentiford Land, Dartmoor

Ponies on the common above Stentiford Land, Dartmoor (see Issue 1)

As Duke of Cornwall, Prince Charles owns Dartmoor, together with much of the rest of the County. But many people living on or near Dartmoor have ancient Commoner's Rights. This means they can turn animals out to graze on the moor without payment of a fee to the Duchy of Cornwall. Sheep, cattle and ponies are free to roam at will, prevented from straying too far by cattle grids sunk into the ground. Sadly, today's motorists seem unprepared to wait while these gentle creatures amble across roads to greener grass and this year there have been numerous deaths among the ponies.

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  Last modified:
30/09/2005